Each member automatically receives a monthly-computerized index on or before the first of each month. This index is used to calculate the player’s handicap at any course on the Slope system (nearly all courses in the U.S. now use Slope and the system is being adopted worldwide).

Calculating your Index

  1. Take your adjusted gross and subtract the course rating of the tees you played. The course rating has a decimal, e.g., 71.3. The result is called a “differential”.
  2. Divide the result of No. 1 by the Slope of the tees you played and multiply by 113. The result is an “adjusted differential”.
  3. Take the lowest 10 of your last 20 adjusted differentials, add them together and multiply by 96%.
  4. Divide the result of No. 3 by 10. Drop everything after the tenths. The result is your index.

We will use our monthly tournament score as three rounds in your stats. We have two different ways to calculate the index, which depends on how many scores we have from you. If we don’t have more than 4 of your rounds then we use the following formula: (Lowest Score) * .96.

If we have 5 or more rounds than we use the following formula:

5 or 6 – Lowest score15 or 16 – Lowest six scores
7 or 8 – Lowest two scores17 – Lowest seven scores
9 or 10 – Lowest three scores18 – Lowest eight scores
11 or 12 – Lowest four scores19 – Lowest nine scores
13 or 14 – Lowest five scores20 – Lowest ten

Handicap Index Adjustment and Withdrawal

The Handicap Committee shall reduce or withdraw the Handicap Indexes of players who do not return all their acceptable scores, or otherwise do not observe the spirit of the USGA Handicap System.

The Handicap Committee has the authority to increase the Handicap Indexes of players who, because of exceptional circumstances, have Handicap Indexes that are too low.

The Committee shall review all USGA Handicap Index adjustments.

Equitable Stroke Control

Equitable Stroke Control (ESC) is the downward adjustment of individual hole scores for handicap purposes in order to make handicaps more representative of a player’s potential ability.

ESC sets a maximum number that a player can post on any hole depending on the player’s Course Handicap.

ESC is used only when a player’s actual or most likely score exceeds his maximum number based on the table below but is applied to all scores for handicap purposes, including tournament scores. There is no limit to the number of holes on which a player may adjust his score.

A Handicap Index determined from scores to which ESC has not been applied may not be termed a USGA Handicap Index.

Course HandicapMaximum Number On Any Hole
9 or lessDouble Bogey
10 through 197
10 through 197
20 through 298
30 through 399
40 or more10

Example 1: A player with a Course Handicap of 13 has a maximum number of 7 for any hole regardless of par. A player with a Course Handicap of 42 has a maximum number of 10 for any hole. A player without an established USGA Handicap Index shall use the maximum Handicap Index of 36.4 for men, or 40.4 for women, converted to a Course Handicap to determine his maximum number.

When conditions of a competition reduce a player’s USGA Handicap Index or Course Handicap, he uses the Course Handicap derived from his actual USGA Handicap Index for ESC purposes, rather than the reduced Handicap Index that he uses for the competition.

Example 2: A player with an Handicap Index of 35.4 and a Course Handicap of 39 might enter a competition in which the conditions of the competition establish a maximum Handicap Index limit of 25.4, which would give a Course Handicap of 28. When applying ESC that player uses the Course Handicap of 39.

Example 3: A player with a Course Handicap of 30 might play in a four-ball stroke play competition in which he is allowed only 90% of his handicap, which is 27 strokes. When applying ESC, he uses the Course Handicap of 30. When conditions of a competition increase a player’s Course Handicap, the player uses the Course Handicap derived from his actual USGA Handicap Index for ESC purposes.

Example 4: A player with an Handicap Index of 25.4 and a Course Handicap of 28 might enter a competition in which players are competing from different tees with Course Ratings of 71.2 and 73.0 (73.0 – 71.2 = 1.8 or 2 strokes).

If the player plays the course with the Course Rating of 73.0, he should receive two additional strokes (difference between the two Course Ratings), which would give him a Course Handicap of 30. However, when applying ESC he uses a Course Handicap of 28.

Under no circumstances shall the procedures of this section be used by a player to manipulate his Handicap Index.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Can the Handicap Committee adjust a player’s Handicap Index?

A. Yes. It is the Handicap Committee’s responsibility to assure that a player’s Handicap Index reflects his or her potential ability. When the scheduled Handicap Index revision does not reflect potential ability, the Handicap Committee should adjust it.

Q. What circumstances should result in an adjustment to a Handicap Index?

A. Under the following circumstances, it will be necessary for the Handicap Committee to make adjustments to the player’s Handicap Index:

  • Improving faster than the System can react
  • Temporary disability (local handicap only)
  • Player manipulates round
  • 10% reduction from the player’s Handicap if the player shoots 4 or more from his NET score. (i.e. NET of 68 or lower from a par 72 course)

NOTE: The committee is not limited to making changes in these cases only.